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‘Good Trouble’ 1×04 recap: “Playing the Game”

Mariana vs. the patriarchy

Good Trouble episode 1×04, “Playing the Game,” Aired January 29, 2019 

Mariana Adams Foster is a smart, outspoken, fierce, and a feminine badass. Honestly, she’s one of my favorite Latinx characters on television.  It’s been tough to watch Mariana’s workplace storyline in Good Trouble. In just a few weeks, her new job at Speculate has chipped away at everything that makes Mariana the badass woman she is.

Speculate sucks. There, I said it.  

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Good Trouble has given us an honest portrayal of how much it sucks to be a woman, and in Mariana’s case, a latina woman working in the world of tech. The Mariana in this episode has given up on work and has chosen to focus on partying. That is, until she shows up at work and is told she has to participate in an interview that highlights the diversity at Speculate.

Raj and Casey, another female engineer, are also taking part of the diversity interview. Mariana challenges them about their willingness to participate in this interview that perpetuate the lie that their workplace culture is inclusive. Raj and Casey are sympathetic,  they agree that Speculate is racist and sexist, but they’re not going to say anything. Speaking up won’t change the culture. It will just get her fired.

Telling it like it is….

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Mariana ignores their advice and vows to tell the truth because that’s who Mariana is. This is the girl who once got called a bitch and responded with “bitches get things done.” So, yes, it would make sense for Mariana to speaks up. Except that’s not what happens. Mariana tells them what they want to hear, she lies and says the culture is great.

I have no doubt that Mariana will eventually speak up, but I admire Good Trouble for the way its choosing to portray this storyline. Mariana is not a kid anymore, the stakes are higher than ever, and speaking up turns out to be harder than she ever thought it would be. It’s a heartbreaking moment to watch. I applaud Good Trouble for showing the complexities of this issue, one that Mariana will continue to face during this season and that millions of women face every day.

Mariana and Raj

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Having said that, I can’t wait for Mariana to get revenge on her awful boss Alex, who this week was sexist to Mariana and racist to Raj. There was a sweet moment between Mariana and Raj at the end of the episode. Each of them opening up about things they’ve done to fit in and get ahead (never forget Mariana’s blonde hair). Mariana ends up inviting Raj to join her for drinks and I can’t wait to see more of these two as friends…or more?

Elsewhere in The Coterie

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  • Callie and the other two clerks, Ben and Rebecca, whose names I promise to learn soon, attend a BBQ at Judge Wilson’s house. They end up making the judge mad at them. At least they can bond over that?
  • Callie’s lifelong talent of stumbling into secrets continues when she accidentally finds out that the Judge’s son is under house arrest and not doing a “semester at sea” like Judge Wilson has been telling people.
  • Speaking of secrets, Ben is dangerously close to finding out that Malika and Callie know each other.
  •  Alice who is amazing, continues to let people take advantage of her. Malika encourages her to stand up for herself. Alice announces that free toilet paper will no longer be provided at The Coterie. It’s a small win for Alice, and yet, she still can’t stand up to Sumi, who is taking advantage of Alice’s love and good nature by making her plan her wedding to another woman. I wish I could give Alice a hug, she deserves one.

What did you think of the episode? Hit the comments and let us know!

Watch Good Trouble Tuesdays on Freeform! 

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Gabriela Acevedo

Gaby is a TV-obsessed fangirl and writer. Television is her true love, but movies and books aren't far behind. Currently living in Los Angeles, she's originally from Puerto Rico, which is still her favorite place in the world. Find her on twitter @gabsteramy.

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